If you intresting in sport steroids you find place where you can find information about steroids Also we can help you win nandrolone decanoate here link for it nandrolone decanoate cycle it realy nice product , also here information about steroids and all nandrolone decanoate products We can recommend this product Deca Durabolin here link for it buy Deca Durabolin cycle it realy nice product , also here information about steroids and all Deca Durabolin products We find nice website where you can find many fresh dj mp3 , and other nice music Download mp3 it realy nice page , you can like it on faceboke , listen music online or download tru torrent or website we can recommend it!
Capt. Tommy Thompson's Saltwater Angler's Guides

Tag: trout

Redfish Classic At Crystal River, Fla. Sept. 18-19, 2015

by on Jul.14, 2015, under Ozello to Crystal River

CRYSTAL RIVER, Fla. – Plantation on Crystal River – a hidden gem located just 80 miles north of Tampa – has partnered with Sodium Fishing Gear, One Rake at A Time Foundation and many others to host the inaugural Plantation Redfish Classic on Saturday, Sept. 19 at Plantation on Crystal River’s Adventure Center and Dive Shop.”Plantation on Crystal River is the premier angler’s resort in Citrus County and after hosting a number of fishing tournaments for other groups and participating in many tournaments ourselves, it was just natural to want to start a tournament we can call our own,” said Paul Cross, Plantation Adventure Center & Dive Shop manager.

Make it a weekend with rooms nights starting at $119 per night for all tournament participants and their families. Hotel guests can take advantage of the lagoon-style pool, complimentary lawn games and even dock their boat on the 1,600 feet of seawall for easy launching the morning of the event. Events throughout the weekend include the Captain’s Dinner on Friday, Sept. 18 at 6 p.m. offering light hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar, Plantation Redfish Classic from daylight to 5 p.m. and Awards Banquet at 7 p.m. on Sept. 19 – and while redfish is the primary quest, there will also be categories for trout and grouper.

Registration fee for two anglers (including a boat captain) is $225 and includes two swag buckets, entry for two to the Captain’s Dinner, tournament fee, entry for two to the Award’s Banquet, two tournament t-shirts and free boat launch. Prizes will include first, second and third place for largest redfish, trout and grouper ranging from $3,000 to $100.

A portion of all proceeds will go to benefit the One Rake at a Time Foundation which cleans Lyngbya, a harmful blue-green algae, out of Kings Bay through the dedication and hard work of local volunteers.

Other sponsors include Young Boats, Home Depot, Unfair Lures, Nick Nicholas Ford, 96.7 The Fox, Citrus 95.3, Lecanto Veterinary Hospital, Homosassa Marina, Yamaha, Corona Light on Draft, and Bimini Bay Outfitters.

For more information about the Plantation Redfish Classic, Plantation on Crystal River or to make a reservation, visit PlantationonCrystalRiver.com or call 800-632-6262.

Leave a Comment :, , , , , more...

Try Trout Piccata–The Lighter Side of Fried Fish

by on May.25, 2014, under Recipes and Food

By the time April rolls around, I’m ready to quit eating heavy cool-weather seafood like fried fish, shrimp and oysters and am interested in lighter fare.  And what better way to impress your family and friends is there than the simple Italian-American dish, fish “Piccata”?  Traditionally, this dish is made with thinly sliced and pounded-flat veal, but any delicate fish like seatrout, flounder or sheepshead are perfect choices in your Sportsman’s Kitchen.

Yes, the fish in this recipe is “fried”, but I prefer using the word “sautéed” to clarify that it’s not battered and boiled in oil, but lightly crisped in just a small amount of butter and olive oil, using only a very light dusting of flour.   Then, it’s served with a pan sauce of lemon juice, dry white wine and capers.  If you’ve not yet tasted capers, this is the perfect recipe to learn about these small pickled berries from the Capparis spinosa bush native to rugged Mediterranean countries.  They’re spicy and tangy, but not so much as to cover up the flavor of the fish.

Keep your meal on the light side with a side of crispy homemade potato chips and some light white or blush wine, remembering that springtime is the time to “lighten up”!

Piscine Piccata

  • 2 fish fillets
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • Flour as needed for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • Chopped parsley for garnish

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the olive oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter. Season the fillets with salt and pepper and dust lightly with the flour. Once the butter foams and begins to brown, add the fish fillets, turn the heat to high, and brown well, turning once, 4 to 5 minutes total.

Remove the fillets to a warm resting place, and add the wine to the pan. Scrape up the browned bits and add the lemon juice along with the capers. Reduce for half a minute, then add the last tablespoon of butter. Check for seasoning and acidity, then return the fillets to the sauce to warm. Sprinkle with parsley and serve. (Serves 2)

Homemade Potato Chips

There are a couple of tricks regarding the successful preparation of homemade potato chips.  First, use a mandolin slicer or very sharp fillet knife to make very thin, even slices.  Second, dry the chips thoroughly before frying in hot, 375-degree, canola or peanut oil.  And finally, don’t overcrowd the pan—cook just a few slices at a time, drain them on paper towels, and season with sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

1 Comment :, , , , , more...

Florida’s Big Bend Flats Come Alive After a Cool Winter…

by on Mar.13, 2014, under FLORIDA'S BIG BEND AND EMERALD COAST

…and it’s time to get out your shallow-running and slow-sinking hard baits for both seatrout and redfish.

As the flats come back to life at the beginning of spring, the redfish and seatrout venture away from their wintertime hidey-holes and head away from shore.   That usually happens in early March in our part of Florida, giving boaters less willing to take chances on our rocky shoreline a better chance of catching a limit of fish for dinner.  While many anglers prefer to fish live baits for springtime fish, the majority of trophy trout (known as “gators” to locals) and redfish are taken with artificial baits that mimic the look and action of small mullet or sardines.

Good choices of hard baits include the  Live Target Scaled Sardine, the Rapala X-Rap or Flat Rap, the MirrOlure 7M, the Yo-Zuri 3D Minnow and the Heddon Swim ‘n Image.  These plugs naturally sink slowly and are designed to run just under the surface of the water when retrieved.   Your ability to make long casts is important, as is your stealth.  Springtime trout and reds can be spooky, so no “hootin’ and hollerinl” is allowed when fishing.  Just make long casts and make a big smile when you hook up to big fish!

Most of the above named lures are available at specialty tackle shops like Captain’s Cove Outfitters (Inglis)Mangrove Creek Outfitters (Chiefland), Gary’s Tackle Box (Gainesville), Alachua Farm and Lumber (Alachua), The Sea Hag Marina (Steinhatchee) and Big Bend Outfitters(Perry).

Leave a Comment :, , , , , , , , , , more...

Tender Is The Trout!–Florida Sportsman “Sportsman’s Kitchen” Article

by on Sep.21, 2013, under Recipes and Food

Seatrout lend themselves to several methods of preparation, but the southern tradition of deep-frying is likely a favorite.   And there’s no reason that fried foods need be greasy.  The use of light cooking oil, like peanut or canola, a simple breading and a hot fire will guarantee results that are crisp, flavorful, and surprisingly healthy.

You’ll have to make the decision whether or not you want to serve your fish as fillets or fingers, known as tenderloins in many areas.  I’d recommend cutting out the bones from smaller fish and then fingering the thick part of the fillet.  If you have big seatrout, picking out the sweet meat under the rib cage is worth the extra effort, so fry the fillets whole. Fillets are probably more appropriate as an entrée; fingers work well as appetizers or in po-boy style sandwiches.

While there are likely as many different types of breading and batters as there are fish in the sea, I prefer a simple coating made from cracker crumbs, plain flour and a dash of Cajun spices.  It’s easy to make and apply–simply dredge your fish in it just as you’re getting ready to fry.

No matter how large the pieces of fish you cook, it’s important that they are put into oil that cooks them quickly.  350 to 375-degrees is the optimum temperature.  If you don’t have a thermometer, simply touch the tip of a ready-to-cook piece of fish into the oil.  If it sizzles, go ahead and start cooking.  As you add additional fillets or fingers, you’ll cool the oil slightly, so it’s important not to cook too many pieces of fish at a time.  When golden brown, your fish is ready to drain on absorbent paper and serve.

If you’re serving your trout in a ‘formal’ setting, consider hushpuppies, Cole slaw and oven-fried potatoes as accompaniments.  This combination will likely earn you accolades comparing you to the best seafood restaurants in your hometown.  A more casual presentation (That means you don’t have to use knives and forks!) is a simple sandwich made with fried fingers, and dressed with lettuce, tomato and tartar sauce.

Finally, remember that whether you serve your fish simple or fancy, the ‘secret’s in the sauce’.  Making your own sauces is a simple alternative to store-bought.  Try jazzing up your cocktail sauce with some hot peppers and remember that tartar sauce ain’t nothin’ but mayonnaise, chopped dill pickles and onion.

Foolproof Seafood Breading

  • 1 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1 boxed stack Saltine crackers (about 70 crackers)
  • 1 tbsp. Cajun spice

Pulverize the crackers in a food processor; mix in flour and Cajun spice.  Makes enough breading to coat about 2 pounds of trout fillets or fingers.

Tangy Seafood Sauce

  • 1 12-ounce bottle Chili Sauce
  • 1 7-ounce bottle Dat’l Do-it Datil Pepper Hot Sauce
  • 2 tbsp. ground horseradish
  • Juice of a large lemon

Oven-Fried Potato Strips

  • 1/2-pound Russet potatoes (per person)
  • Peanut or canola oil
  • Sea salt

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Peel and cut potatoes into strips.  Dry thoroughly with paper towels.  Coat a cookie sheet with a light coating of oil.  Arrange potato strips in a single layer.  Bake about 45-minutes, turning strips at least once to ensure browning.  Salt to taste after baking.

Leave a Comment :, , , , more...

21 Steps From Southern White Pine to Finished Fishing Plugs–High Roller Lures Are Made In The U.S.A.!

by on Aug.10, 2013, under CAPT. TOMMY'S BOOK SIGNINGS, TALKS, TRAVELS, FLORIDA'S BIG BEND AND EMERALD COAST, TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

The Jertberg family operates what seems to be a small, ‘Mom and Pop’, fishing lure factory in Gainesville, Florida, U.S.A.  But it’s only small in terms of square footage.  High Roller Lures are now sold in tackle shops all over the Southeast U.S. as well as in select Bass Pro Shops stores in Florida (Islamorada, Miami, Danie and Orlando).  Terry Jertberg’s background is in fishing and painting, and his formative years spent in Brazil taught him all there is to know about fishing the Amazon Basin and about the devastation sharp fish teeth can do to fishing lures.  With that in mind, High Rollers are tough from head to tail.  The company makes several sizes of lures to catch inshore saltwater, freshwater, offshore, surf and big, mean South American species.  The most popular plug, and the one I use on Florida’s coastal waters for redfish and seatrout is the 3.25-inch Rip Roller Florida Special.  It’s sturdy, and is just right for making long casts to spooky fish with light spinning tackle.  The Rip Roller is also made in larger sizes and several other colors.

Take a tour of the High Roller, from start to finish:

The start: southern white pine stock

Terry Jertberg at the lathe, turning a plug blank.

Blanks are dipped in paint and then allowed to harden.

Cured blanks waiting for paint.

Lots of "handwork" goes into the making of a High Roller Lure

After painting, more curing is needed.

The next step--applying the characteristic "flecking" on the lures. Then more curing!

My favorites--the "Florida Specials"--waiting for hooks and eyes

Just about finished...

The final products--on the shelves of your favorite tackle store!

1 Comment :, , , , , , , more...

Taylor County Fall Trout Tournament, Keaton Beach, 9/8/12

by on Sep.03, 2012, under Keaton Beach to Fenholloway

You don’t want to miss this event!  With a guaranteed $3000 payout, there will be lots of competition but there are plenty of chances to win.  Categories include the heaviest 5-trout stinger, big trout, big redfish, redfish with the most spots and heaviest “mystery” fish.  The event kicks off with a 6:30PM Friday, September 7 Captains’ meeting at the Keaton Beach Marina.  Fishing starts at safe light (30 minutes before sunrise) and weigh-in is scheduled for 3PM.  Host marina is the Keaton Beach Marina.

The entry fee is $30 per angler, with registration from 5AM until 7AM at the marina.  You may register at the Perry-Taylor County Chamber of Commerce the prior week.  For more information, or to register, call either Capt. Ashley Mock (850-843-0566) or the Chamber of Commerce (850-584-5366).

1 Comment :, , more...

Capt. Tommy’s One-Minute Fishing Lessons–Spotted Sea Trout

by on Apr.01, 2011, under ONE-MINUTE FISHING LESSONS

This is the first in a series of one-minute videos about fish, fishing, boating and related activities I’m producing.  Enjoy!

Leave a Comment :, , , , more...

Read about Keaton Beach trout flats in the April 2011 Florida Sportsman Big Bend Action Spotter

by on Mar.25, 2011, under Keaton Beach to Fenholloway, Steinhatchee

Take a look at the April 2011 Big Bend Action Spotter column in Florida Sportsman magazine and learn all about fishing the flats at Keaton Beach.

Keaton Beach is know for its great trout fishing and this month’s column has some good GPS numbers as well as tips and tricks.

Leave a Comment :, , , , more...

Suwannee Fishing Report, March 20, 2011, from Capt. Les Flaherty

by on Mar.21, 2011, under Suwannee

Capt. Les Flaherty at Suwannee reports that trout are moving along the big bars at Lone Cabbage Reef, Tarpon Gap, Seven Brothers and Red Bank Reef.  Sheepshead have shown up, but are mostly smaller male fish.  Look for them around Hedemon and Red Bank.

Leave a Comment :, , , more...

Northern Region Gulf of Mexico Trout Season to Re-Open March 1, 2011

by on Feb.27, 2011, under FLORIDA'S BIG BEND AND EMERALD COAST

Luckily, February is a short month.  We haven’t had to suffer too much during the mandatory spotted sea trout closure, but we have had some warm weather.  Don’t expect the fish to be in the deep river or creek holes when the season re-opens this week, as they’ve moved towards the shallow flats.  Water temperatures at Steinhatchee have been above 65-degrees for over a week now, and there are signs of bait schooling on the flats.

TTTROUT0211

Expect to find spotted sea trout on the shallow flats when the 2011 season re-opens on March 1.

Leave a Comment :, , , , more...

Looking for something?

Use the form below to search the site:

Still not finding what you're looking for? Drop a comment on a post or contact us so we can take care of it!