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Tag: recipe

Heads Are Optional—A Great Recipe For Whole Grilled Fish

by on Oct.29, 2017, under Recipes and Food

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If black sea bass grew to six feet long, I’d quit swimming in Gulf or Atlantic waters. These guys are fierce. Luckily, we rarely see them over a foot long in the Gulf and a four-plus pound Atlantic version is considered a “trophy”. Bag limits vary, too. You can keep 100 pounds of 10-plus inchers in the Gulf, but only 5 13-inch plus fish on the eastern side of the state.

All too often, black sea bass are considered by-catch by anglers targeting larger reef fish. They seem to inhabit the same reefs as grouper and grunts, and are often found inshore over live bottom in the 6 to 10-foot depth. And slot-sized specimens are worth keeping for dinner. They’ll attack almost any bait you offer, especially soft plastics or jigs tipped with shrimp or squid. They can be pesky, and all too often are overlooked. However, I don’t think there’s a better tasting fish available. Yes, the soft white fillets are small, and it takes a bunch from the Gulf to make a great fried fish dinner, but frying isn’t your only option. My advice: fire up the grill, gas or charcoal, and cook them whole.

Or almost whole.

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Grilling whole fish can be tricky, and members of the grouper family, like black sea bass, have “big shoulders”. That means one end of the fish cooks more quickly than at the other. Allow at least one fish per serving, and after scaling and gutting your catch, take a pair of kitchen shears to the pectoral fins. Trim them off, but leave the tails and dorsal fins intact. Cover them with aluminum foil to prevent them from burning off while cooking. I like to leave the heads, for drama—and for some of the best-eating meat. Score both sides of your fish with a sharp knife and put a sprig or two of your favorite herb in the body cavities. Dill or rosemary work well. Generously salt the fish with sea salt and brush with extra virgin olive oil just before you put them on the grill.

Eating these small fish, in fillet form or whole, is not an exercise in big forkfuls of meat. If served whole, there’s some picking involved and to some of your guests, getting used to their dinner looking them squarely in the eye can be off-putting.

Just remember–heads are optional.

 

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Grouper All’Amatriciana—A Simple and Special Recipe

by on Oct.29, 2017, under Recipes and Food

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Summer’s over. And what a summer it’s been—at least in terms of tomatoes. Produce counters overflowed with rich-tasting Burpee’s Big Boys as well as plump Romas. As a result, prices were so reasonable that sliced tomatoes were an everyday option on many Floridians’ supper tables. Just a simple splash of olive oil, red wine vinegar, and a dash of salt and pepper were all that was needed for this southern favorite. But there is an option to fresh tomatoes, and that’s especially true in Italian cooking, even at the height of the summertime “bumper crop”.

 

That option, canned tomatoes, span a range from watery and bland to rich and luscious. The best ones come from Italy’s Samo Valley, and they are distinctly (and legally) labeled “San Marzano”.   Open a can, take a whiff and you’ll know why they’re favored, year-round, over fresh tomatoes in many cooked Italian recipes.

 

Sugo all’amatriciana is a staple of Italian cooking. A combination of tomatoes, basil, garlic and cured pork, it’s an easy dish to prepare and can be served over pasta or, in the case of this recipe, as a sauce for your favorite firm white fish.

 

Grouper All’Amatriciana

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1- 28oz can San Marzano tomatoes, whole and peeled

4-ounces cured pork (pancetta), finely chopped

4-cloves garlic, chopped

1/2-teaspoon crushed red pepper

4-tbs. fresh basil leaves, chopped

1/4-cup extra virgin olive oil

4-6oz. portions grouper (or other firm-fleshed fish)

peanut oil

Zatarain’s “Wonderful” seafood breading mix

 

While you’re crisping the chopped pork in the olive oil in a saucepan, drain the tomatoes in a wire-mesh strainer while crushing them with a fork. When the bacon’s cooked, add the tomatoes, garlic, pepper, and stir. Cook about 5 minutes over low heat, taking care not to dry out the sauce. If it gets too dry, a shot of good red wine will help thin it out. Finally, add the fresh basil to the sauce.

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Easy Peasy Seafood Pizza

by on Oct.29, 2017, under Recipes and Food

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Over the past 50 years, pizzas have, in my opinion, moved from the sublime to the ridiculous. A simple “tomato pie” topped with mozzarella cheese and pepperoni is now hard to find, and pizzas topped like cheeseburgers or peanut butter-and-jelly sandwiches have made their way to “pizzeria” menu boards.   Don’t get me wrong, I like fancy pizzas as much as the next guy, but…

 

So how about a fancy pizza that’s easy to prepare and one that will excite your family and friends when they come to your dinner table?

 

Pesto Pizza with Sun-Dried Tomatoes and Seafood

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First, make some pizza dough in your food processor, let it rise twice. Next, crush basil, garlic and pine nuts and olive oil with your mortar and pestle. Then, dry some San Marzano tomatoes in your food dehydrator and soak them in extra virgin olive oil for a day or so. Finally, when it’s time to cook, form the dough into a 12 to 16-inch round.

 

Just kidding!!! Here’s my simple method with easy ingredients:

 

Buy a pre-made pizza crust (I like the 2-for-$2.99 crusts at Trader Joe’s.) or some pizza dough at the Publix bakery (In either case, buy several–I keep pre-made crusts in the freezer for last-minute meals).

 

Pre-heat your oven to 450-degrees. Form the dough, if necessary, and put it on a lightly oiled pan. Top with a layer of store-bought pesto, followed by chunks of mozzarella cheese and some well-drained store-bought sun-dried tomatoes (packed in olive oil).   Sprinkle with some sea salt, a few crushed red pepper flakes and some dry oregano.   Cook until cheese melts and the crust starts to brown, 10-15 minutes.

 

At this point, the choice of seafood is yours. I like 40-50 count shrimp, peeled and deveined. You might consider bay scallops, sliced sea scallops, clams, squid rings or even thin slices of pre-grilled octopus. The final cooking time is up to you and depends on how long it takes to cook your seafood. 10-minutes should be sufficient, and you may want to finish the cooking under the broiler, to add color.

 

Give the pizza a few minutes to cool after it comes out of the oven and then top with some shaved Parmesan cheese and a sprinkle of chopped Italian parsley. Then, hide the empty jars and packages—and take credit for all the “work” you’ve done!

 

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Keep Seafood COLD, Not Just COOL — For Safety’s Sake!

by on Oct.29, 2017, under Cedar Key, Recipes and Food

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When fishing, there’s never enough ice. Of course, keeping drinks and lunch cool is important, but “cool” doesn’t cut the mustard when it comes to the safe storage of our catch. Once boated, both shellfish and finfish begin to degrade quickly. There are, however, a few tricks to remember.

 

The first thing to do is to get your ice as cold as possible. If you plan a fishing trip, throw a small bag of ice in the cooler the night before. Pre-cooling the cooler will temper it, and ice will last longer in the next day’s heat. Then, as close to your point of departure as is possible, fill you cooler completely with ice. And, if possible, put a couple reusable frozen ice packs like the Arctic Ice Tundra or a handful of frozen bottles of water under your store-bought ice. That will prevent some melting and your ice will last longer.

 

Second, once your catch starts coming aboard, drain any water off your ice, add a few quarts of salt water to create a super-cooled slurry, and put your catch into the ice right away. Don’t leave fish on the deck to die, as just a few minutes in the hot sun can make a big difference at the dinner table.

 

Finally, with regards to seafood safety, use an appropriate cooler. Unfortunately, the better coolers are the most expensive, but they do hold ice longer. Know that white coolers reflect sunlight and stay cooler while dark ones absorb heat, and any cooler kept in the shade will work best. And if you already own a dark surfaced cooler, consider covering it with a white towel.

 

 

Island Hotel’s Hearts of Palm Salad

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Here’s a cool recipe that’s perfect for a hot summer day. It was originally created by Bessie Gibbs at Cedar Key’s Island Hotel in the 1950’s. The current owners of the hotel, Andy and Stanley Bair, shared it with me. It’s simple, and flexible. The key to its unique flavor is the dressing, the hearts of palm, and the chopped, sugared dates.

 

Seasonal greens and fruits (sliced kiwis, grapes, strawberries, melon chunks)

Sugared dates, chopped

Hearts of palm, cut into bite-sized pieces

 

 

 

 

Dressing (serves 4-6)

 

Thoroughly combine the following and re-freeze. Put a scoop atop the assembled salad just before you serve.

 

1-pint vanilla ice cream

1-pint lime sherbet

1/4-cup peanut butter

1/4-cup mayonnaise

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It’s All About Umami–The Fifth Taste!

by on Oct.29, 2017, under Recipes and Food

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Unless you’re an avid “foodie” you may not have heard about umami, one of the five basic tastes, along with sweetness, sourness, bitterness and saltiness. It’s hard to describe but “savory” or “meaty” seem appropriate.   And you’ve likely experienced umami when you’ve eaten soy-based sauces, smoked fish, mushrooms or Asian foods. According to food historians, the popularity of ketchup is based largely on umami!

From the standpoint of a food chemist, umami has lots to do with glutamates and their relationship with other tastes, especially salty and sweet. From the standpoint of a person taking a bite of food, it’s what makes food “yummy”, sometimes with a tingle on the back of the mouth and throat. That’s the reason monosodium glutamate (MSG) is often added to food in restaurants (not just the Asian ones!) where taste is what brings return customers. And, by the way, there’s a new school of thought that MSG doesn’t create the dramatic allergic reactions once attributed to it. Now you’ll find recommendations that MSG, like other things that make food and drink taste good, sugar and alcohol for instance, be consumed in moderation.

We’ve all seen the ubiquitous menu item, “ teriyaki fish” in restaurants. That’s just the (usually unimpressive) tip of the iceberg with regards to umami-flavored foods. Simply taking a slab of fish and soaking it for 20 minutes in store-bought teriyaki sauce is the easy way out. My advice is that you spend a bit more time with your preparation and kick your food up a notch, using simple Asian ingredients like miso, sake and mirin. All these ingredients combine to make a tasty marinade for seafood, and a savory glaze to finish.

 

Miso Marinade and Glaze

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1/2-cup mirin (sweet rice wine)*

1/2-cup sake (rice wine)*

4 tbs. red miso paste (made from fermented soybeans)*

1 tbs. sugar

3 tbs. vegetarian oyster mushroom sauce *

2 tsp. toasted sesame oil *

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 tbs. ginger (finely grated or paste)

2 tbs. sesame seeds

 

Combine all the ingredients, reserving half the sesame seeds for garnish. Marinate firm-fleshed fish (swordfish, tuna, king mackerel, wahoo or cobia), shrimp or sea scallops for about 20-minutes. Don’t soak it too long. While the seafood is grilling (gas is good; charcoal is better), reduce marinade into a glaze the consistency of heavy cream. Spoon or brush the glaze onto the seafood just before serving and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

 

 

*These ingredients are available at Asian specialty groceries, but are becoming more and more present on the shelves of larger supermarkets like Publix.

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Scallops “In The Raw”….Try Ceviche This Season!

by on Jun.27, 2014, under Chassahowitzka and Homosassa, Ozello to Crystal River, Port St. Joe, Mexico Beach and St. Joseph Bay, Recipes and Food, St. Marks, Aucilla and Econfina, Steinhatchee

Scallop Ceviche is easy to make--and very tasty!Scallop Ceviche* is easy to make–and very tasty!

A sophisticated approach to eating freshly shucked scallops is to ‘cook’ them in a marinade and serve them as a salad.  Scallops prepared as a ceviche have been pickled, in a sense, and are delicious.

Scallop Ceviche

2 individual limits of shucked scallops (about 2 pounds or 2 pints), drained

For the marinade:

1-1/2 cup fresh lime juice

1 cup fresh lemon juice

1 cup chopped fresh cilantro leaves

4 small Serrano peppers, seeded and very finely chopped

3 cloves garlic, finely chopped

1 small red onion, coarsely chopped

1 tablespoon sea salt

freshly ground black pepper, to taste

fresh cilantro leaves,  for garnish

Mix all the ingredients for the marinade in a zipper-style bag.  You can refrigerate this marinade for a day of so, if necessary.  Two hours before serving, add the scallops and mix.  Drain away the excess juices and assemble the ceviche over salad greens or an avocado half.  Touch everything off with a garnish with cilantro leaves.  Dinner is served.

A meal of fresh bay scallops, no matter how they’re prepared, is perfect way to end the perfect day on the water with the family.

*Eating uncooked seafood has its risks.  Always consult a medical professional regarding your personal situation before eating uncooked seafood.

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Lionfish–Just Kill ‘Em & Cook ‘Em

by on May.25, 2014, under Recipes and Food

Don’t get me wrong.  I’m all for catch-and-release or for just keeping enough fish for dinner.   But then there are lionfish, Pterois volitans, an invasive species threatening to eat juvenile reef fish and take over much of Florida’s offshore waters.

Previously found only in aquariums, these spectacular fish have in recent years invaded Florida’s reefs, raising concerns of scientists and anglers alike.  Armed with highly venomous spines, these fish have few predators with the exception of spear-fishermen.  In fact, the FWC now allows divers to harvest any number of lionfish without a recreational fishing license so long as they are doing so with pole spears, Hawaiian slings, or dip nets.  Lionfish season is open, and lionfish are an excellent choice for dinner.

You’ll have to catch your own lionfish or beg them from a friend.  My friends at Gainesville’s Northwest Seafood found me a few as by-catch from a deep-water grouper trip and gave me a lesson in cleaning them.  I recommend getting some heavy gloves, sharpening your favorite knife, and being extra-careful to not get stuck by one of the fish’s venomous spines.    Also, unless you know the origin of the fish you’re preparing, question your source regarding whether or not it came from a tropical or sub-tropical reef that’s known to hold fish with the ciguatera toxin.  Ciguatera isn’t fun and is certainly something to avoid.  If you’re not sure about the origin of your filets, consider using any other firm white fish for this recipe.

Chef Michael’s Lionfish Ambassador

Michael Ledwith, of Chef Michael’s Restaurant in Islamorada, claims lionfish taste much like hogfish, and that’s why you’ll sometimes find them on his menu.  His “Lionfish Ambassador” recipe makes those small tasty lionfish filets fit for any table.

4 to 6 fresh lionfish filets

1 tbs. butter

1 tbs. canola oil

1 tbs. chopped shallot

1 cup sliced shiitake mushrooms

2 tbs. capers

I tbs. key lime juice

1 cup good Chardonnay wine

¼ cup heavy cream

1 tbs. chopped flat leaf (Italian) parsley

½ cup fresh crab meat

In a large non-stick skillet, bring butter and oil to medium-high heat.  Season lionfish filets with salt and freshly ground pepper, then add to oil, cooking for about 3 minutes.  Remove fish from skillet and reserve on a plate.  Add shallots to hot skillet; cook for about one minute.  Add mushrooms and capers; cook about 2 minutes.  Add the wine and lime juice and simmer on medium heat for about 4 minutes.  Finally, add the cream, crab meat, parsley and the fish filets and simmer until the fish is fork-tender.

This recipe serves 4 and is best accompanied by grilled vegetables and a glass of whatever Chardonnay is left over from the recipe.

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Try Trout Piccata–The Lighter Side of Fried Fish

by on May.25, 2014, under Recipes and Food

By the time April rolls around, I’m ready to quit eating heavy cool-weather seafood like fried fish, shrimp and oysters and am interested in lighter fare.  And what better way to impress your family and friends is there than the simple Italian-American dish, fish “Piccata”?  Traditionally, this dish is made with thinly sliced and pounded-flat veal, but any delicate fish like seatrout, flounder or sheepshead are perfect choices in your Sportsman’s Kitchen.

Yes, the fish in this recipe is “fried”, but I prefer using the word “sautéed” to clarify that it’s not battered and boiled in oil, but lightly crisped in just a small amount of butter and olive oil, using only a very light dusting of flour.   Then, it’s served with a pan sauce of lemon juice, dry white wine and capers.  If you’ve not yet tasted capers, this is the perfect recipe to learn about these small pickled berries from the Capparis spinosa bush native to rugged Mediterranean countries.  They’re spicy and tangy, but not so much as to cover up the flavor of the fish.

Keep your meal on the light side with a side of crispy homemade potato chips and some light white or blush wine, remembering that springtime is the time to “lighten up”!

Piscine Piccata

  • 2 fish fillets
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • Flour as needed for dusting
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup dry white wine
  • 1 tablespoon capers
  • Chopped parsley for garnish

Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Once hot, add the olive oil and 2 tablespoons of the butter. Season the fillets with salt and pepper and dust lightly with the flour. Once the butter foams and begins to brown, add the fish fillets, turn the heat to high, and brown well, turning once, 4 to 5 minutes total.

Remove the fillets to a warm resting place, and add the wine to the pan. Scrape up the browned bits and add the lemon juice along with the capers. Reduce for half a minute, then add the last tablespoon of butter. Check for seasoning and acidity, then return the fillets to the sauce to warm. Sprinkle with parsley and serve. (Serves 2)

Homemade Potato Chips

There are a couple of tricks regarding the successful preparation of homemade potato chips.  First, use a mandolin slicer or very sharp fillet knife to make very thin, even slices.  Second, dry the chips thoroughly before frying in hot, 375-degree, canola or peanut oil.  And finally, don’t overcrowd the pan—cook just a few slices at a time, drain them on paper towels, and season with sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper.

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Interested in Oysters? Head to Ouzt’s Too in Newport, FL

by on Jan.29, 2014, under Recipes and Food, Shell Point to Lanark, Ochlockonee Bay, St. Marks, Aucilla and Econfina

I’m “old school” and only eat oysters in months whose spelling includes an “R”.  Yes, I realize we now have cleaner waters flowing over oyster beds these days and have excellent refrigeration technology, but I’m still not a fan of oysters taken from warm water.  Warmer conditions mean an increased danger of contamination, and oysters are filter feeders with the potential for concentrating harmful bacteria, like Vibrio vulnificus, in warm water. For that reason, I consider February to be the peak of oyster season here in Florida.

I don’t get many arguments when I say that the nation’s best oysters come from Wakulla and Franklin counties in Florida’s Big Bend.  Oystermen in places like Panacea and Apalachicola have carefully protected their “crops” for generations, and those “fields” produce some of the tastiest oysters available.  Salty and fat, these oysters are best savored either “raw” or with just a touch of horseradish or cocktail sauce.  And they’re certainly not the oysters you let slide down the back of your throat without chewing.   However, many folks like to eat oysters “dressed” and complex recipes like Oysters Rockefeller and Oysters Bienville headline menus from Florida to Texas.  And every so often, something simple just jumps up off the table, begging you to take a bite.

That’s the story behind the Oysters Supreme and the Oysters Nacho at Ouzts’ Too Oyster Bar, located on the west side of the St. Marks River in Newport.  This Wakulla County watering hole has been there for over three-quarters of a century, and is going strong, attracting an array of characters eager to chow down on fresh-shucked oysters and smoked local mullet.   Owner Dorthy White and her crew pride themselves in oysters shucked “as they’re ordered” and a relaxed atmosphere that includes live music, karaoke and even guitar pickin’ in the “toilet garden” out back.  And while oysters “on the half shell” headline the Outzs’ Too menu, they offer these two simple twists for patrons who enjoy their oysters warm or spicy.  These variations are easy to make and will certainly please even the least adventurous guest at your table or happy hour.

Oysters Supreme/Oysters Nacho

Arrange a dozen or so small or medium shucked oysters (Save the large ones to eat raw!) on a microwaveable plate or platter.  Take care to free the oyster from the bottom shell when you’re shucking as that makes eating easier.  Put about a half-teaspoon of butter on each oyster, and then add either a teaspoon of chopped cooked bacon or a slice of pickled jalapeño pepper.  Top with some shredded Cheddar cheese and microwave on high power for 2 to 4 minutes, depending on how well done you like your oysters.  Serve with cold beer—of course!

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Cupid’s Crabby Cupcakes (Or…Get Some Tonight!)

by on Dec.27, 2013, under Recipes and Food

Luckily, St. Valentine’s Day 2014 doesn’t fall on a weekend fishing day, giving each of us the opportunity to spoil our sweethearts with a special home-cooked meal.  And what’s better than delicious, easy-to-prepare, crab cakes?

Chefs’ interpretations of crab cakes range from the ordinary to the sublime.  Many consider that if a crab is passed over a lump of doughy bread, a crab cake is created.  Others, like me, insist on fewer binders and lots of crab.  After all, there’s probably no seafood that deserves less “doctoring” than crab.  It’s sweet—just like your sweetie.

I’ve seen recipes for crab cakes made with all varieties of these “beautiful swimmers”, but it’s the common blue crab that tops my list.  Pasteurized blue crab meat, lump or claw, is readily available at supermarkets and specialty seafood shops.  Live blue crabs, yours for the boiling and picking, are often available at coastal fish houses.  And if you’re in the mood to catch your own, a dip net and a chicken neck tied to a string tossed from almost any Florida seawall will soon provide you a bucket of crabs.

I’m convinced that one of the reasons that crab cakes served in restaurants have a considerable amount of bread and binders is due to ease of cooking and presentation.  Cakes with lots of crabmeat tend to fall apart and get messy, for the chef and the establishment’s reputation.  Some restaurants refrigerate their crab cake mix prior to cooking, and then dust the cakes with flour or breading before dropping them into a deep fryer.  The result is usually a fried crab-flavored bread ball.  Others, who emphasize that there is crab in the recipe, make patties and more properly sauté them in a little bit of oil or butter.  These taste better, but depending on how much crab meat is included, almost always fall apart on their trip from the skillet to the plate.

In my personal quest for the most tasty and photogenic of all crab cakes, I’ve found that baking them in muffin pans helps maintain a consistent shape and crisp exterior, even with a high crab-to-binder ratio.  Lightly packing the crab cake mix into a hot pan will give you a head start on a crispy exterior.  If you still have Grandma’s cast iron muffin pan, use it.  If not, the heavier the pan, the better. You’ll notice that the recipe included here has very little bread, just a few spices and veggies, one egg and a bit of mayonnaise to hold it all together.  Don’t overwork the mix, taking special care to fold the ingredients together rather than mash them up into a paste.

Crab-picking time (or crab-shopping time) aside, my Cupid’s Crabby Cupcakes are a quick fix, even on a weekday night.  Served with a simple green salad and a glass or two of dry Pinot Grigio blush wine, you’ll be the hit of your Valentine’s Day festivities.

Cupid’s Crabby Cupcakes

1 pound lump crabmeat

1/4 –cup minced scallions (green part)

2 tbs. chopped parsley

1 tsp. Old Bay seasoning

1/4-cup plain breadcrumbs

1/4-cup mayonnaise

1 large egg

Canola oil spray

Pre-heat oven to 400-degrees and then heat muffin pan, lightly greased with canola oil, for 10 minutes.  As the pan heats, gently mix remaining ingredients in a large bowl, using a rubber spatula.  When the pan is hot, quickly spoon the crab mix into the individual compartments, lightly compacting it with the back of your spoon and taking care to keep the top level.  Bake the cakes for 30 minutes, and then cool for 5 minutes before removing and serving.  Makes 4 cakes.

Spicy Sweetheart Sauce

1/4-cup mayonnaise

1/4-cup sour cream

2 tbs. finely chopped chipotle chiles*

1 tsp. finely chopped garlic

2 tsp. chopped cilantro leaves

Juice of a small lemon

Mix ingredients in a small bowl, cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes, allowing flavors to blend.

*Best found canned, in adobo sauce, in the ethnic foods department of your local Publix Supermarket.

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