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Capt. Tommy Thompson's Saltwater Angler's Guides

Tag: Gulf of Mexico

2017 bay scallop season in Dixie/Taylor counties set

by on Feb.11, 2017, under Hernando and Pasco Gulf Coast, Horseshoe Beach, Keaton Beach to Fenholloway, Ozello to Crystal River, Port St. Joe, Mexico Beach and St. Joseph Bay, Shell Point to Lanark, Ochlockonee Bay, St. Marks, Aucilla and Econfina, Steinhatchee, Suwannee, Yankeetown and Waccasassa

The 2017 bay scallop season for Dixie County and parts of Taylor County will be open from June 16 through Sept. 10. This includes all state waters from the Suwannee River through the Fenholloway River. These changes are for 2017 only and are an opportunity to explore regionally-specific bay scallop seasons.

These changes were discussed at the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) meeting on Feb. 8, where staff was directed to work with local community leaders on selecting potential 2017 season dates and to adopt changes by executive order.

At the Feb. 8 meeting, staff also updated the Commission on the status of bay scallops in St. Joseph Bay in Gulf County, and set a July 25 through Sept. 10 recreational bay scallop season off Gulf County, including all waters in St. Joseph Bay and those west of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County, through the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County.

A prolonged red tide event in late 2015 negatively impacted the scallop population in St. Joseph Bay, which led to modified local scallop regulations for 2016 that included a shortened season and reduced bag limits. FWC researchers conducted a scallop restoration project last year within St. Joseph Bay to help speed the recovery of the scallop population. These efforts have been going well and the scallop population has shown signs of improvement. Staff will conduct similar restoration efforts in 2017.

All other portions of the bay scallop harvest zone will be open from July 1 through Sept. 24. This includes all state waters from the Pasco-Hernando county line to the Suwannee River Alligator Pass Daybeacon 4 in Levy County and from north and west of Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County through the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.

Bag and vessel limits throughout the entire bay scallop harvest zone will be 2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gallon bay scallop meat per vessel.

At the December 2017 Commission meeting, staff will review public feedback on these changes and make a recommendation for future management. To submit your feedback on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/SaltwaterComments.

For more information on these changes, visit MyFWC.com/Commission and select “Commission Meetings,” then click on the link below “Next Meeting.”

For information on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Bay Scallops.”

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Capt. Rick Grassett’s Sarasota, FL Fishing Report for 10/15/2016

by on Oct.16, 2016, under Bradenton and Sarasota, TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Anglers fishing Sarasota Bay with me during the past week, out of CB’s Saltwater Outfitters on Siesta Key, caught and released trout, jacks and small gag grouper on DOA Lures and flies. Fly anglers also caught and released snook in the ICW near Venice on a night trip. Water conditions in Sarasota Bay were good during the past week; clear water with baitfish present and no signs of red tide in the areas that I fished.

Stewart Lavelle, from Sarasota, FL and David Lavelle, from Venice, FL, fished Sarasota Bay with me last Sunday. We fished the east side of the bay, which had good, clean water. They caught and released a few trout and jacks on Ultra Hair Clouser flies and DOA Deadly Combos. Sarasota winter resident Tom Lamb and Roy and Diane Glah, also from Sarasota, fished Sarasota Bay with me on Thursday afternoon. They caught and released trout, including a couple of slot-size fish, and small gag grouper on CAL jigs with shad tails and DOA Shrimp.

David Weber, from Memphis, TN and Dudley Sandifer, from MS, fished the ICW near Venice with me on Wednesday evening. We had a good tide but snook were being very picky and tough to get to eat our flies. However they persisted and caught and released a few snook on my Grassett Snook Minnow fly.

CB’s Saltwater Outfitters had a good turnout for their Orvis Fly Fishing 101 introductory fly fishing clinic on Saturday. I was one of the instructors for the clinic, which gave students an opportunity to fly cast and understand the principles of fly fishing. Contact CB’s Saltwater Outfitters at (941) 349-4400 or info@cbsoutfitters.com for info on upcoming Orvis-Endorsed Fly Fishing Schools.

I look for action in the coastal gulf with false albacore (little tunny) and Spanish mackerel to take off as the water cools down and baitfish become more plentiful. Tripletail will also become a good option since stone crab traps are now in the coastal gulf, increasing the amount of available structure for them. Night snook fishing around lighted docks and bridges in the ICW with flies and DOA Lures should be a good option. You might also find a few juvenile tarpon and reds in the lights along with snook. In addition, there should be good action with trout, Spanish mackerel, bluefish and more on deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay.

Tight Lines,
Capt. Rick Grassett
IFFF Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Orvis-Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide at CB’s Saltwater Outfitters
Orvis Outfitter of the Year-2011
Snook Fin-Addict Guide Service, Inc.
www.snookfin-addict.com, www.snookfinaddict.com and www.flyfishingflorida.us
E-mail snookfin@aol.com
(941) 923-7799

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Capt. Rick Grassett’s Sarasota Bay, FL Fishing Report for 10/1/2016

by on Oct.01, 2016, under Bradenton and Sarasota

Anglers fishing Sarasota Bay with me during the past week, out of CB’s Saltwater Outfitters on Siesta Key, caught and released juvenile tarpon, trout and jacks on flies. Although there is red tide in some areas of Sarasota Bay, particularly close to passes, there are areas that are fine. Red tide may actually concentrate fish in some areas as fish move away from affected areas.

Marshall Dinerman, from the Atlanta area, fished deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay with me on Monday. He had good action catching and releasing trout and jacks on Ultra Hair Clouser flies. We also fished a backwater area where he caught and released a juvenile tarpon on my Grassett Flats Bunny fly with a 6-wt. His first tarpon on a fly!

I had an instructional fly fishing trip in Sarasota Bay on Tuesday. We worked on basics and were shooting line and catching and releasing a few fish before the end of the trip. This is a good option for beginning fly anglers, since it is different when fishing from the deck of a boat with different fly lines and weighted flies as opposed to casting on grass or from the shore of a lake.

I look for action in the coastal gulf with false albacore (little tunny) and Spanish mackerel to take off as the water cools down and baitfish become more plentiful. Tripletail will also become a good option as stone crab traps hit the water next week, increasing the amount of available structure for them. Night snook fishing around lighted docks and bridges in the ICW with flies and DOA Lures should be a good option. You might also find a few juvenile tarpon and reds in the lights along with snook. In addition, there should be good action with trout, Spanish mackerel, bluefish and more on deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay.

Tight Lines,
Capt. Rick Grassett
IFFF Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Orvis-Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide at CB’s Saltwater Outfitters
Orvis Outfitter of the Year-2011
Snook Fin-Addict Guide Service, Inc.
www.snookfin-addict.com, www.snookfinaddict.com and www.flyfishingflorida.us
E-mail snookfin@aol.com
(941) 923-7799

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Capt. Rick Grassett’s Sarasota & Gasparilla Sound, FL Fishing Report for 3/6/2016

by on Mar.07, 2016, under Bradenton and Sarasota, TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Anglers fishing with me on my Action Craft flats skiff the Snook Fin-Addict, out of CB’s Saltwater Outfitters on Siesta Key, caught and released trout, bluefish, Spanish mackerel, pompano and ladyfish in Sarasota Bay, trout and redfish in Gasparilla Sound, tripletail in the coastal gulf and snook at night in the ICW near Venice on CAL jigs with shad tails and flies during the past week. With the water temperature up into the mid 60’s, there was good action on deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay with trout, bluefish and more, tripletail in the coastal gulf and snook at night in the ICW.

Martin Marlowe, from NY, fished a couple of days in Sarasota Bay with me on Monday and Saturday. He was joined by his son, Bruce Marlowe from RI, on Saturday. They had good action with trout to 18”, bluefish and ladyfish on CAL jigs with shad tails and Ultra Hair Clouser flies fishing deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay. Martin also snook fished with me in the ICW near Venice on Sunday evening and had great action catching and releasing snook on my Grassett Snook Minnow fly.

Joe Polidoro and his father-in-law, Murray Bring, both from Sarasota fished Sarasota Bay with me on Tuesday and had good action catching and releasing trout, ladyfish and a pompano on Ultra Hair Clouser flies. Keith McClintock, from Lake Forest, IL, fished Gasparilla Sound near Boca Grande with me on Wednesday. We worked edges of bars and backcountry areas where he had some action with trout and a red on CAL jigs with shad tails.

Steve Kost, from Lakewood Ranch, FL and his guest, John Makovitch, from Pinehurst, NC, fished Sarasota Bay and the coastal gulf with me on Thursday. John caught and released his first tripletail on a DOA Shrimp in the coastal gulf and his first fish on a fly in Sarasota Bay! They also had good action with trout and a Spanish mackerel on Ultra Hair Clouser flies and CAL jigs with shad tails on both shallow and deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay. Shane Nichols, from MA, fished the coastal gulf with me on Friday and had good action catching and releasing several tripletail and getting some shots at others with DOA Shrimp.

I gave a presentation on “Fly Fishing the West Coast of Florida” at the News Channel 8 Outdoors Expo & Boat Show at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa on Sunday and spent some time at the DOA Fishing Lures booth. The new version of the DOA Shrimp and the new DOA Snake were featured at the show and should be a hit!

There is still time to sign up for CB’s Saltwater Outfitters Orvis-Endorsed Fly Fishing School next Saturday, March 12. The school will cover fly casting basics, line control, shooting line and the roll cast. Leader construction, fly selection and saltwater fly fishing techniques will also be covered in the class. The course, designed for beginning and intermediate fly casters, will focus on basics but also work with intermediate casters on correcting faults and improving casting skills. Cost for the school, which will run from 8:30 AM to 3 PM, is $150 per person and includes the use of Orvis fly tackle, a text book and lunch. Contact CB’s Saltwater Outfitters at (941) 349-4400 or info@cbsoutfitters.com to make reservations.

Tripletail should be a good option in the coastal gulf when conditions are good. Trout, bluefish and more on deep grass flats of Sarasota Bay and night snook fishing around lighted docks and bridges in the ICW with flies and DOA Lures should also be good options. Look for reds and big trout mixed with mullet schools or cruising shallow flats and edges of bars in Sarasota Bay and backcountry areas of Charlotte Harbor and lower Tampa Bay.

Tight Lines,
Capt. Rick Grassett
IFFF Certified Fly Casting Instructor
Orvis-Endorsed Fly Fishing Guide at CB’s Saltwater Outfitters
Orvis Outfitter of the Year-2011
Snook Fin-Addict Guide Service, Inc.
www.snookfin-addict.com, www.snookfinaddict.com and www.flyfishingflorida.us
E-mail snookfin@aol.com
(941) 923-7799

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Chilling thoughts for winter fishing–By Capt. Ray Markham

by on Jan.16, 2016, under FLORIDA'S BIG BEND AND EMERALD COAST, TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Fish have to deal with the cold every day during winter. But being cold-blooded, cold weather doesn’t have the same effect as it does on humans. Living in sunny Florida, most of us don’t give much thought to the possibility of developing hypothermia. But with winter weather finally upon us, dressing appropriately for being on the water can be a matter of life and death, particularly if you fall into the water. The body loses heat 25-times faster in water than it does with exposure to the air. This is all the more reason to wear a personal flotation device in the event you do fall overboard.

Cold fronts that have been hitting us at about a weekly basis or more often have been driving the water temperature downward for the past couple of weeks. Sitting in the mid-sixties now, and with wind on the water, the wind chill factor drops the ‘feels like’ temperature even more. It’s important to dress in layers of clothing. Shivering is probably the first sign of the onset of hypothermia as the body core temperature drops. It’s better to have more clothing than you need, since you can always remove some as the days warm up.

Find areas out of the wind. Those spots will be more comfortable for both you and the fish. Warmer areas will also mean that fish appetites will be on the rise. Unlike cold-blooded creatures, we still need to eat on a regular basis. Fish eat when they feel hungry or the opportunity presents itself. Sheepshead are working the pilings around bridges, docks, piers and around most any structure. Most recently flounder are appearing in holes on the flats on these negative tide days. Dragging CAL Curly tailed jigs across the holes slowly will catch flatties. With the falling water temperature, snook are moving up inside the rivers. All of the Tampa Bay’s rivers are holding snook. Look for the power plants in the area to produce a plume of warm water around the outflows. Apollo Beach and Anclote Key both produce warm water on the coldest days. The most recent weather prediction is for the coldest days yet this winter to be the first part of next week. Cobia, snook, trout, pompano, sharks, ladyfish, jacks and more will be found around these plants. Warmer water will move up to a half-mile away from the power plant on still days.

Fish extra slow during cold weather and remember to dress for the occasion to stay comfortable and keep warm. ‘Til then…I’ll catch ya later!

Capt. Ray Markham specializes in fly and light tackle fishing with artificial lures, charters out of the Tampa Bay area, and may be reached via his website at www.CaptainRayMarkham.com, email at ray.markham@gmail.com, or at (941) 723-2655 for charter.

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Making the most of winter fishing days — By Ray Markham

by on Jan.08, 2016, under FLORIDA'S BIG BEND AND EMERALD COAST, TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Fishing during the winter has both its good points and drawbacks. But over-all, if you work with what you have, you’ll find that your disadvantages can also work for you.

Weekly cold fronts can stir up water, make seas and bays rough, and drop water temperature putting a virtual if not real lock jaw on fish. Even on the worst of days you can probably catch fish, as long as you deal with your conditions.

The most obvious change in winter will be water temperature. During the spring, summer, and fall, water temperatures will be up, making the metabolic rates soar. But during the hottest days of summer, the heat can be a drawback, forcing you to find areas with temperatures within the comfort range of fish. Offshore, you’ll need to find the depth where there is enough insulation between the surface and the bottom where fish will hold. In shallow water, you’ll still need to find some deeper areas for fish to comfortably hold, but that’s not all. Fish may hold in vast areas of small bays, but only feed in one area because of a difference in water temperature and water clarity. Temperatures can vary as much as 10-degrees in areas just blocks away because of the type of structure, bottom, or protection from the elements. Dead end residential canals protected from the wind that run north and south and with dark muddy bottoms and good depth will generally hold fish that will feed. The west side of that canal receives sun first as the sun rises and heats that side first making fish on that side of the canal more active. The east side benefits by the day-long heat produced by exposure to the sun and by afternoon will probably be the most productive.

Cold water kills off algae that grow during warm months improving water clarity. Sight-fishing is at its peak, but fish can also see you the best, making long accurate casts imperative to catching fish. On windy days, you can increase the distance of your casts by casting downwind, making the stealth approach to fish with your bait or lure easier.

High, cold winds stir up water and drop the temperature even more. Find areas with wind breaks or out of the wind and you’ll minimize that effect. Live shrimp are the most predominant inshore food source during winter and the slow movements they make are in tune with metabolic rates for fish. The DOA Shrimp that I throw is my go-to winter lure because it is the best imitation of what fish eat.

Dealing with the wind, cold, and water clarity issues can turn even slow problem days into productive days when you understand how to deal with them.

Capt. Ray Markham specializes in fly and light tackle fishing with artificial lures, charters out of the Tampa Bay area, and may be reached via his website at www.CaptainRayMarkham.com, email at ray.markham@gmail.com, or at (941) 723-2655 for charter.

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Tampa Bay Fishing Report, 12/11/15, Capt. Ray Markham–“Fishing away from red tide is outstanding!”

by on Dec.12, 2015, under TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

Anyone who knows me or has heard me talk about fishing over the past few weeks probably heard me mention red tide. Make no mistake about it, red tide is affecting our fishing where the bloom is present and on the periphery of where it is located. The key to catching fish is to move away from the red tide bloom and the outskirts of it. Healthy fish continue to eat and put on a normal rod-bending show.

Flashing back about ten years, red tide nearly decimated our fishery. In the lower Tampa Bay area, spotted seatrout never fully regained the population of big fish or numbers of fish we had back then, but it was still acceptable to people outside of the fishing capital of the world. While snook populations took it on the chin along with numerous other species, most did survive the ordeal only to be hit by a series of days with hard freezees about five years ago. Nature’s damage can be devastating, but add unethical anglers who kill fish by improper handling or keeping illegal sizes or numbers of fish are other issues.

Recognizing the signs of red tide are the first steps toward finding healthy areas that support active fish. Start with the internet and check out information from the FWC at http://myfwc.com/REDTIDESTATUS. This will give you general areas that are affected. Observation is the next step. Signs of red tide can affect your eyes and breathing along with producing dead fish, but not always. Wind blowing from the direction of the red tide can push dead fish to the perimeter of an affected area or areas that are free of the toxin. If you see or smell it, move. Fish in perimeter areas can be affected but still alive, and act as you might if you are sick and not eat.

Good fishable areas show signs of life and active feeding. The areas that I have fished recently that were good have bait in the area as well as mullet schools. Mullet are late moving out to spawn, but areas around John’s Pass and the ICW up to Indian Rocks produced trout, bluefish, jacks, ladyfish, flounder, redfish, snook, and Spanish mackerel. Middle to upper Tampa Bay north of Piney Point to Apollo Beach had exceptional action with snook, trout, redfish, bluefish, jacks, ladyfish, and even cobia. The rest of Tampa Bay north to Double Branch was normal with no signs of red tide.

Red tide will move fish and push them to unaffected areas if they escape. By noting the signs and differences of both good and bad areas, you will catch fish.

Capt. Ray Markham specializes in fly and light tackle fishing with artificial lures, charters out of the Tampa Bay area, and may be reached via his website at www.CaptainRayMarkham.com, email at ray.markham@gmail.com, or at (941) 723-2655 for charter.

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Red tide posing problems in portions of Tampa Bay and south By Ray Markham

by on Nov.27, 2015, under TAMPA BAY AND SOUTHWEST FLORIDA

As much as I hate to report this, red tide has again reared its ugly head, stretching from Charlotte Harbor to north Manatee County and parts of the south Pinellas beaches. For charter captains in Charlotte, Sarasota, and parts of Manatee County this has been a real problem keeping bait alive for the live baiters. But on the positive side, bait dying in the livewell is like the proverbial canary in the coal mines. Dying bait instantly tells you to move. But for anglers like myself who fish strictly with artificial lures we have to look for other signs that the toxic bloom is around.

Fish move when the first signs of red tide show up. But not all fish move in the right direction. Some head into back bays and get trapped by the bloom and die. Others remain in schools and die. My first indication is the obvious—dead fish. But when I’m seeing fish but finding that I detect eye or breathing irritation, I move. While fish may be there, the bloom seems to turn the bite off for fish that are present. The old adage of never leave fish to find fish doesn’t apply here. While even healthy fish don’t always bite, if I find irritation and presence of fish I move to find fish without sensing the irritation.

On recent trips down around the Bulkhead and the mouth of the Manatee River we’ve been on schools of redfish, trout, snook, and have caught good numbers of flounder. Mullet schools were jumping everywhere. But on a day following one of those good trips, the area looked like a deserted wasteland. It wasn’t until I moved well up into Tampa Bay that we found more feeding fish. Joe Bay, Bishop’s Harbor, and the South Shore areas seemed to be unaffected and we continued catching fish there with no signs of the red tide there.

I had similar results in areas while fishing off South Pinellas around Fort Desoto. Schooling redfish around Conception Key were there one day and gone the next, and irritation of my eyes was my indicator that the algae bloom may be present. Moving north, the John’s Pass area was in good shape, and fishing that area produced good numbers of redfish, trout, snook, and flounder. Poking my head outside the pass, we caught bluefish and Spanish mackerel.

Noting the signs of a red tide problem may keep you from wasting your time in affected areas that are marginal for killing fish, yet still support life. Fish caught in areas of red tide are ok for consumption as long as they appear to be healthy otherwise. Updated information on red tide can be found at http://myfwc.com/REDTIDESTATUS. To report a fish kill, call 1-800-300-9399.

Capt. Ray Markham specializes in fly and light tackle fishing with artificial lures, charters out of the Tampa Bay area, and may be reached via his website at www.CaptainRayMarkham.com, email at ray.markham@gmail.com, or at (941) 723-2655 for charter.

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The Revival of Mary’s Fish Camp–A Hernando County Landmark

by on Sep.16, 2015, under Hernando and Pasco Gulf Coast

Mary's Fish Camp--A Hernando County Landmark! 8092 Marys Fish Camp Rd, Weeki Wachee, FL 34607

Mary’s Fish Camp–A Hernando County Landmark!
8092 Marys Fish Camp Rd, Weeki Wachee, FL 34607 www,marysfishcamp.org

 

I’d bet that the number of “legitimate” fish camps in the state of Florida can be counted on the fingers of both my hands.  With Florida’s rapid growth and the desire of the tourist and native population for hotels with hot tubs, free breakfast buffets and beach access, the few fish camps with cabins, RV parking, shoreline fishing, and the simpler things in life have been pushed aside in the name of “progress”.

Mary's is simple, with 3 cabins, a bait shop, and 16 RV spaces, on the Mudd River.

Mary’s is simple, with 3 cabins, a bait shop, and 16 RV spaces, on the Mud River near Weeki Wachee, Florida

When I wrote ” The Saltwater Angler’s Guide to Tampa Bay and Southwest Florida”, I started with a chapter on Hernando County.  At that time (2011), Mary’s was one of the few places to stay in the Weeki Wachee/Bayport area that reminded me of the “real Florida”.  After the book was published, and after Mary’s death, the place fell into disrepair and was soon closed.

Fishing from the seawall at Mary's is a local tradition--and a bargain at $6 a person!

Fishing from the seawall at Mary’s is a local tradition–and a bargain at $6 a person!

I’m happy to say that Mary’s has been revived and is scheduled to re-open in early October, 2015.  With lots of hard work, fond memories, and some cash, several local entrepreneurs are returning Mary’s to its original “glory”.  A simple place.  A place to relax.  A place to fish.

The cabins at Mary's have been rebuilt, with new kitchens and air-conditioning!

The cabins at Mary’s have been updated, with new kitchens and air-conditioning!

Mary’s is located at the end of Mary’s Fish Camp Road (where else?), just off Cortez Blvd, west of US19 in Bayport.  The Mud River flows downriver from Mary’s to the Gulf.  Along the way, it’s met by the flow of the “famous for mermaids” Weeki Wachee River.

marys 6

And, if you’re wondering why Mary’s Fish Camp is there, it’s simple.  There’s great fishing and scalloping just outside the Mud River on the Bayport flats, as well as near the multitude of shallow rocky outcrops that dot the Gulf coastline here.

 

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Tips For Successful Scalloping During Rainy Season on Florida’s Big Bend, 2015

by on Aug.17, 2015, under Keaton Beach to Fenholloway, Ozello to Crystal River, Port St. Joe, Mexico Beach and St. Joseph Bay, Steinhatchee

In the late summer, water visibility can hinder and slow the harvest of bay scallops.  This year, they’re plentiful along our big Bend coastline, but are often hard to see.

You may not catch thousands of scallops in murky water, but if you work hard, you'll come home with a nice dinner!

You may not catch thousands of scallops in murky water, but if you work hard, you’ll come home with a nice dinner!

We’ve had more than our fair share of rain on the Big Bend, too. Mornings have been calm, but with high humidity and high air temperatures, thunderstorms have been building up every afternoon. Usually they form on shore, but some can eventually drift off the coast in the late afternoon, depending on the strength of the east coast sea breezes. What that means for you, the scalloper, is that you need to take your trips early, watch the radar (use the Weather Bug app on your smartphone!), and try to get back to port by mid-afternoon at the latest.

Snorkeling for bay scallops is a fun, family adventure!

Snorkeling for bay scallops is a fun, family adventure!

Despite the amount of rainwater we’ve seen in ditches and pastures miles from the coast, the visibility of the Gulf waters isn’t as bad as I expected.   Scallopers north of Steinhatchee and Keaton Beach are doing well, especially off Piney Point and off Dekle Beach.  The only thing I can’t predict is just how long the visibility will be good. It usually takes several weeks for the leaching cycle to complete.

Don't let thunderstorms like this one come between you and your home port!

Don’t let thunderstorms like this one come between you and your home port!

 

 

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